example.aliases.drushrc.php

  1. 8.0.x examples/example.aliases.drushrc.php
  2. 6.x examples/example.aliases.drushrc.php
  3. 7.x examples/example.aliases.drushrc.php
  4. 3.x examples/example.aliases.drushrc.php
  5. 4.x examples/example.aliases.drushrc.php
  6. 5.x examples/example.aliases.drushrc.php
  7. master examples/example.aliases.drushrc.php

Example of valid statements for an alias file.

Use this file as a guide to creating your own aliases.

Aliases are commonly used to define short names for local or remote Drupal installations; however, an alias is really nothing more than a collection of options. A canonical alias named "dev" that points to a local Drupal site named "http://example.com" looks like this:

$aliases['dev'] = array(
  'root' => '/path/to/drupal',
  'uri' => 'http://example.com',
);

With this alias definition, then the following commands are equivalent:

$ drush @dev status $ drush --root=/path/to/drupal --uri=http://example.com status

See the --uri option documentation below for hints on setting its value.

Any option that can be placed on the drush commandline can also appear in an alias definition.

There are several ways to create alias files.

+ Put each alias in a separate file called ALIASNAME.alias.drushrc.php + Put multiple aliases in a single file called aliases.drushrc.php + Put groups of aliases into files called GROUPNAME.aliases.drushrc.php

Drush will search for aliases in any of these files using the alias search path. The following locations are examined for alias files:

1. In any path set in $options['alias-path'] in drushrc.php, or (equivalently) any path passed in via --alias-path=... on the command line. 2. In one of the default locations: a. /etc/drush b. $HOME/.drush 3. In one of the site-specific locations: a. The /drush and /sites/all/drush folders for the current Drupal site b. The /drush folder in the directory above the current Drupal site

These locations are searched recursively. If there is a folder called 'site-aliases' in any search path, then Drush will search for site aliases only inside that directory.

The preferred locations for alias files, then, are:

/etc/drush/site-aliases $HOME/.drush/site-aliases $ROOT/drush/site-aliases $ROOT/sites/all/drush/site-aliases $ROOT/../drush/site-aliases

Or any path set in $options['alias-path'] or via --alias-path.

Folders and files containing other versions of drush in their names will be *skipped* (e.g. mysite.aliases.drush4rc.php or drush4/mysite.aliases.drushrc.php). Names containing the current version of Drush (e.g. mysite.aliases.drush5rc.php) will be loaded.

Files stored in these locations can be used to create aliases to local and remote Drupal installations. These aliases can be used in place of a site specification on the command line, and may also be used in arguments to certain commands such as "drush rsync" and "drush sql-sync".

Alias files that are named after the single alias they contain may use the syntax for the canonical alias shown at the top of this file, or they may set values in $options, just like a drushrc.php configuration file:

$options['uri'] = 'http://example.com';
$options['root'] = '/path/to/drupal';

When alias files use this form, then the name of the alias is taken from the first part of the alias filename.

Alias groups (aliases stored together in files called GROUPNAME.aliases.drushrc.php, as mentioned above) also create an implicit namespace that is named after the group name.

For example:

# File: mysite.aliases.drushrc.php
$aliases['dev'] = array(
  'root' => '/path/to/drupal',
  'uri' => 'http://example.com',
);
$aliases['live'] = array(
  'root' => '/other/path/to/drupal',
  'uri' => 'http://example.com',
);

Then the following special aliases are defined:

  • @mysite: An alias named after the groupname may be used to reference all of the aliases in the group (e.g., `drush @mydrupalsite status`).
  • @mysite.dev: A copy of @dev.
  • @mysite.live: A copy of @live.

Thus, aliases defined in an alias group file may be referred to either by their simple (short) name, or by their full namespace-qualified name.

To see an example alias definition for the current bootstrapped site, use the "site-alias" command with the built-in alias "@self":

$ drush site-alias @self

TIP: If you would like to have drush include a 'databases' record in the output, include the options --with-db and --show-passwords:

$ drush site-alias @self --with-db --show-passwords

Drush also supports *remote* site aliases. When a site alias is defined for a remote site, Drush will use the ssh command to run the requested command on the remote machine. The simplest remote alias looks like this:

$aliases['live'] = array(
  'remote-host' => 'server.domain.com',
  'remote-user' => 'www-admin',
);

The form above requires that Drush be installed on the remote machine, and that there also be an alias of the same name defined on that machine. The remote alias should define the 'root' and 'uri' elements, as shown in the initial example at the top of this file.

If you do not wish to maintain site aliases on the remote machine, then you may define an alias that contains all of the elements 'remote-host', 'remote-user', 'root' and 'uri'. If you do this, then Drush will make the remote call using the --root and --uri options to identify the site, so no site alias is required on the remote server.

$aliases['live'] = array(
  'remote-host' => 'server.domain.com',
  'remote-user' => 'www-admin',
  'root' => '/other/path/to/drupal',
  'uri' => 'http://example.com',
);

If you would like to see all of the Drupal sites at a specified root directory, use the built-in alias "@sites":

$ drush -r /path/to/drupal site-alias @sites

It is also possible to define explicit lists of sites using a special alias list definition. Alias lists contain a list of alias names in the group, and no other information. For example:

$aliases['mydevsites'] = array(
  'site-list' => array('@mysite.dev', '@otherside.dev')
);

The built-in alias "@none" represents the state of no Drupal site; to ignore the site at the cwd and just see default drush status:

$ drush @none status

See `drush help site-alias` for more options for displaying site aliases. See `drush topic docs-bastion` for instructions on configuring remote access to a Drupal site behind a firewall via a bastion server.

Although most aliases will contain only a few options, a number of settings that are commonly used appear below:

  • 'uri': In Drupal 7 and 8, the value of --uri should always be the same as when the site is being accessed from a web browser (e.g. http://example.com) In Drupal 6, the value of --uri should always be the same as the site's folder name in the 'sites' folder (e.g. default); it is best if the site folder name matches the URI from the browser, and is consistent on every instance of the same site (e.g. also use sites/example.com for http://example.com).
  • 'root': The Drupal root; must not be specified as a relative path.
  • 'remote-host': The fully-qualified domain name of the remote system hosting the Drupal instance. **Important Note: The remote-host option must be omitted for local sites, as this option controls various operations, such as whether or not rsync parameters are for local or remote machines, and so on. - 'remote-user': The username to log in as when using ssh or rsync.
  • 'os': The operating system of the remote server. Valid values are 'Windows' and 'Linux'. Be sure to set this value for all remote aliases because the default value is PHP_OS if 'remote-host' is not set, and 'Linux' (or $options['remote-os']) if it is. Therefore, if you set a 'remote-host' value, and your remote OS is Windows, if you do not set the 'OS' value, it will default to 'Linux' and could cause unintended consequences, particularly when running 'drush sql-sync'.
  • 'ssh-options': If the target requires special options, such as a non- standard port, alternative identity file, or alternative authentication method, ssh-options can contain a string of extra options that are used with the ssh command, eg "-p 100"
  • 'parent': Deprecated. See "altering aliases", below.
  • 'path-aliases': An array of aliases for common rsync targets. Relative aliases are always taken from the Drupal root.

    • '%drush-script': The path to the 'drush' script, or to 'drush.php'. This is used by backend invoke when drush runs a drush command. The default is 'drush' on remote machines, or the full path to drush.php on the local machine.
    • '%drush': A read-only property: points to the folder that the drush script is stored in.
    • '%files': Path to 'files' directory. This will be looked up if not specified.
    • '%root': A reference to the Drupal root defined in the 'root' item in the site alias record.
  • 'php': path to custom php interpreter. Windows support limited to Cygwin.
  • 'php-options': commandline options for php interpreter, you may want to set this to '-d error_reporting="E_ALL^E_DEPRECATED"'
  • 'variables' : An array of name/value pairs which override Drupal variables/config. These values take precedence even over settings.php overrides.
  • 'command-specific': These options will only be set if the alias is used with the specified command. In the example below, the option `--no-dump` will be selected whenever the @stage alias is used in any of the following ways:

    • `drush @stage sql-sync @self @live`
    • `drush sql-sync @stage @live`
    • `drush sql-sync @live @stage`

    In case of conflicting options, command-specific options in targets (source and destination) take precedence over command-specific options in the bootstrapped site, and command-specific options in a destination alias will take precedence over those in a source alias.

  • 'source-command-specific' and 'target-command-specific': Behaves exactly like the 'command-specific' option, but is applied only if the alias is used as the source or target, respectively, of an rsync or sql-sync command. In the example below, `--skip-tables-list=comments` whenever the alias @live is the target of an sql-sync command, but comments will be included if @live is the source for the sql-sync command.
  • '#peer': Settings that begin with a '#' are not used directly by Drush, and in fact are removed before making a backend invoke call (for example). These kinds of values are useful in conjunction with shell aliases. See `drush topic docs-shell-aliases` for more information on this.
  • '#env-vars': An associative array of keys and values that should be set on the remote side before invoking drush.
  • rsync command options have specific requirements in order to be passed through by Drush. See the comments on the sample below:
'command-specific' => array (
  'core-rsync' => array (

    // single-letter rsync options are placed in the 'mode' key
    // instead of adding '--mode=rultvz' to drush rsync command.
    'mode' => 'rultvz',

    // multi-letter rsync options without values must be set to
    // TRUE or NULL to work (i.e. setting $VALUE to 1, 0, or ''
    // will not work).
    'delete' => TRUE,

    // if you need multiple excludes, use an rsync exclude file
    'exclude-from' => "'/etc/rsync/exclude.rules'",

    // filter options with white space must be wrapped in "" to preserve
    // the inner ''.
    'filter' => "'exclude *.sql'",

    // if you need multple filter options, see rsync merge-file options
    'filter' => "'merge /etc/rsync/default.rules'",
  ),
),

Altering aliases:

Alias records are written in php, so you may use php code to alter alias records if you wish. For example:

$common_live = array(
  'remote-host' => 'myserver.isp.com',
  'remote-user' => 'www-admin',
);

$aliases['live'] = array(
  'uri' => 'http://example.com',
  'root' => '/path.to/root',
) + $common_live;

If you wish, you might want to put $common_live in a separate file, and include it at the top of each alias file that uses it.

You may also use a policy file to alter aliases in code as they are loaded by Drush. See policy_drush_sitealias_alter in `drush topic docs-policy` for details.

Some examples appear below. Remove the leading hash signs to enable.

See also

hook_drush_sitealias_alter() in drush.api.php

File

examples/example.aliases.drushrc.php
View source
  1. <?php
  2. /**
  3. * @file
  4. * Example of valid statements for an alias file.
  5. *
  6. * Use this file as a guide to creating your own aliases.
  7. *
  8. * Aliases are commonly used to define short names for
  9. * local or remote Drupal installations; however, an alias
  10. * is really nothing more than a collection of options.
  11. * A canonical alias named "dev" that points to a local
  12. * Drupal site named "http://example.com" looks like this:
  13. *
  14. * @code
  15. * $aliases['dev'] = array(
  16. * 'root' => '/path/to/drupal',
  17. * 'uri' => 'http://example.com',
  18. * );
  19. * @endcode
  20. *
  21. * With this alias definition, then the following commands
  22. * are equivalent:
  23. *
  24. * $ drush @dev status
  25. * $ drush --root=/path/to/drupal --uri=http://example.com status
  26. *
  27. * See the --uri option documentation below for hints on setting its value.
  28. *
  29. * Any option that can be placed on the drush commandline
  30. * can also appear in an alias definition.
  31. *
  32. * There are several ways to create alias files.
  33. *
  34. * + Put each alias in a separate file called ALIASNAME.alias.drushrc.php
  35. * + Put multiple aliases in a single file called aliases.drushrc.php
  36. * + Put groups of aliases into files called GROUPNAME.aliases.drushrc.php
  37. *
  38. * Drush will search for aliases in any of these files using
  39. * the alias search path. The following locations are examined
  40. * for alias files:
  41. *
  42. * 1. In any path set in $options['alias-path'] in drushrc.php,
  43. * or (equivalently) any path passed in via --alias-path=...
  44. * on the command line.
  45. * 2. In one of the default locations:
  46. * a. /etc/drush
  47. * b. $HOME/.drush
  48. * 3. In one of the site-specific locations:
  49. * a. The /drush and /sites/all/drush folders for the current Drupal site
  50. * b. The /drush folder in the directory above the current Drupal site
  51. *
  52. * These locations are searched recursively. If there is a folder called
  53. * 'site-aliases' in any search path, then Drush will search for site aliases
  54. * only inside that directory.
  55. *
  56. * The preferred locations for alias files, then, are:
  57. *
  58. * /etc/drush/site-aliases
  59. * $HOME/.drush/site-aliases
  60. * $ROOT/drush/site-aliases
  61. * $ROOT/sites/all/drush/site-aliases
  62. * $ROOT/../drush/site-aliases
  63. *
  64. * Or any path set in $options['alias-path'] or via --alias-path.
  65. *
  66. * Folders and files containing other versions of drush in their names will
  67. * be *skipped* (e.g. mysite.aliases.drush4rc.php or
  68. * drush4/mysite.aliases.drushrc.php). Names containing the current version of
  69. * Drush (e.g. mysite.aliases.drush5rc.php) will be loaded.
  70. *
  71. * Files stored in these locations can be used to create aliases
  72. * to local and remote Drupal installations. These aliases can be
  73. * used in place of a site specification on the command line, and
  74. * may also be used in arguments to certain commands such as
  75. * "drush rsync" and "drush sql-sync".
  76. *
  77. * Alias files that are named after the single alias they contain
  78. * may use the syntax for the canonical alias shown at the top of
  79. * this file, or they may set values in $options, just
  80. * like a drushrc.php configuration file:
  81. *
  82. * @code
  83. * $options['uri'] = 'http://example.com';
  84. * $options['root'] = '/path/to/drupal';
  85. * @endcode
  86. *
  87. * When alias files use this form, then the name of the alias
  88. * is taken from the first part of the alias filename.
  89. *
  90. * Alias groups (aliases stored together in files called
  91. * GROUPNAME.aliases.drushrc.php, as mentioned above) also
  92. * create an implicit namespace that is named after the group
  93. * name.
  94. *
  95. * For example:
  96. *
  97. * @code
  98. * # File: mysite.aliases.drushrc.php
  99. * $aliases['dev'] = array(
  100. * 'root' => '/path/to/drupal',
  101. * 'uri' => 'http://example.com',
  102. * );
  103. * $aliases['live'] = array(
  104. * 'root' => '/other/path/to/drupal',
  105. * 'uri' => 'http://example.com',
  106. * );
  107. * @endcode
  108. *
  109. * Then the following special aliases are defined:
  110. * - @mysite: An alias named after the groupname may be used to reference all of
  111. * the aliases in the group (e.g., `drush @mydrupalsite status`).
  112. * - @mysite.dev: A copy of @dev.
  113. * - @mysite.live: A copy of @live.
  114. *
  115. * Thus, aliases defined in an alias group file may be referred to
  116. * either by their simple (short) name, or by their full namespace-qualified
  117. * name.
  118. *
  119. * To see an example alias definition for the current bootstrapped
  120. * site, use the "site-alias" command with the built-in alias "@self":
  121. *
  122. * $ drush site-alias @self
  123. *
  124. * TIP: If you would like to have drush include a 'databases' record
  125. * in the output, include the options --with-db and --show-passwords:
  126. *
  127. * $ drush site-alias @self --with-db --show-passwords
  128. *
  129. * Drush also supports *remote* site aliases. When a site alias is
  130. * defined for a remote site, Drush will use the ssh command to run
  131. * the requested command on the remote machine. The simplest remote
  132. * alias looks like this:
  133. *
  134. * @code
  135. * $aliases['live'] = array(
  136. * 'remote-host' => 'server.domain.com',
  137. * 'remote-user' => 'www-admin',
  138. * );
  139. * @endcode
  140. *
  141. * The form above requires that Drush be installed on the remote machine,
  142. * and that there also be an alias of the same name defined on that
  143. * machine. The remote alias should define the 'root' and 'uri' elements,
  144. * as shown in the initial example at the top of this file.
  145. *
  146. * If you do not wish to maintain site aliases on the remote machine,
  147. * then you may define an alias that contains all of the elements
  148. * 'remote-host', 'remote-user', 'root' and 'uri'. If you do this, then
  149. * Drush will make the remote call using the --root and --uri options
  150. * to identify the site, so no site alias is required on the remote server.
  151. *
  152. * @code
  153. * $aliases['live'] = array(
  154. * 'remote-host' => 'server.domain.com',
  155. * 'remote-user' => 'www-admin',
  156. * 'root' => '/other/path/to/drupal',
  157. * 'uri' => 'http://example.com',
  158. * );
  159. * @endcode
  160. *
  161. * If you would like to see all of the Drupal sites at a specified
  162. * root directory, use the built-in alias "@sites":
  163. *
  164. * $ drush -r /path/to/drupal site-alias @sites
  165. *
  166. * It is also possible to define explicit lists of sites using a special
  167. * alias list definition. Alias lists contain a list of alias names in
  168. * the group, and no other information. For example:
  169. *
  170. * @code
  171. * $aliases['mydevsites'] = array(
  172. * 'site-list' => array('@mysite.dev', '@otherside.dev')
  173. * );
  174. * @endcode
  175. *
  176. * The built-in alias "@none" represents the state of no Drupal site;
  177. * to ignore the site at the cwd and just see default drush status:
  178. *
  179. * $ drush @none status
  180. *
  181. * See `drush help site-alias` for more options for displaying site
  182. * aliases. See `drush topic docs-bastion` for instructions on configuring
  183. * remote access to a Drupal site behind a firewall via a bastion server.
  184. *
  185. * Although most aliases will contain only a few options, a number
  186. * of settings that are commonly used appear below:
  187. *
  188. * - 'uri': In Drupal 7 and 8, the value of --uri should always be the same as
  189. * when the site is being accessed from a web browser (e.g. http://example.com)
  190. * In Drupal 6, the value of --uri should always be the same as the site's folder
  191. * name in the 'sites' folder (e.g. default); it is best if the site folder name
  192. * matches the URI from the browser, and is consistent on every instance of the
  193. * same site (e.g. also use sites/example.com for http://example.com).
  194. * - 'root': The Drupal root; must not be specified as a relative path.
  195. * - 'remote-host': The fully-qualified domain name of the remote system
  196. * hosting the Drupal instance. **Important Note: The remote-host option
  197. * must be omitted for local sites, as this option controls various
  198. * operations, such as whether or not rsync parameters are for local or
  199. * remote machines, and so on. @see hook_drush_sitealias_alter() in drush.api.php
  200. * - 'remote-user': The username to log in as when using ssh or rsync.
  201. * - 'os': The operating system of the remote server. Valid values
  202. * are 'Windows' and 'Linux'. Be sure to set this value for all remote
  203. * aliases because the default value is PHP_OS if 'remote-host'
  204. * is not set, and 'Linux' (or $options['remote-os']) if it is. Therefore,
  205. * if you set a 'remote-host' value, and your remote OS is Windows, if you
  206. * do not set the 'OS' value, it will default to 'Linux' and could cause
  207. * unintended consequences, particularly when running 'drush sql-sync'.
  208. * - 'ssh-options': If the target requires special options, such as a non-
  209. * standard port, alternative identity file, or alternative
  210. * authentication method, ssh-options can contain a string of extra
  211. * options that are used with the ssh command, eg "-p 100"
  212. * - 'parent': Deprecated. See "altering aliases", below.
  213. * - 'path-aliases': An array of aliases for common rsync targets.
  214. * Relative aliases are always taken from the Drupal root.
  215. * - '%drush-script': The path to the 'drush' script, or to 'drush.php'.
  216. * This is used by backend invoke when drush
  217. * runs a drush command. The default is 'drush' on remote machines, or
  218. * the full path to drush.php on the local machine.
  219. * - '%drush': A read-only property: points to the folder that the drush
  220. * script is stored in.
  221. * - '%files': Path to 'files' directory. This will be looked up if not
  222. * specified.
  223. * - '%root': A reference to the Drupal root defined in the 'root' item in the
  224. * site alias record.
  225. * - 'php': path to custom php interpreter. Windows support limited to Cygwin.
  226. * - 'php-options': commandline options for php interpreter, you may
  227. * want to set this to '-d error_reporting="E_ALL^E_DEPRECATED"'
  228. * - 'variables' : An array of name/value pairs which override Drupal
  229. * variables/config. These values take precedence even over settings.php
  230. * overrides.
  231. * - 'command-specific': These options will only be set if the alias
  232. * is used with the specified command. In the example below, the option
  233. * `--no-dump` will be selected whenever the @stage alias
  234. * is used in any of the following ways:
  235. * - `drush @stage sql-sync @self @live`
  236. * - `drush sql-sync @stage @live`
  237. * - `drush sql-sync @live @stage`
  238. * In case of conflicting options, command-specific options in targets
  239. * (source and destination) take precedence over command-specific options
  240. * in the bootstrapped site, and command-specific options in a destination
  241. * alias will take precedence over those in a source alias.
  242. * - 'source-command-specific' and 'target-command-specific': Behaves exactly
  243. * like the 'command-specific' option, but is applied only if the alias
  244. * is used as the source or target, respectively, of an rsync or sql-sync
  245. * command. In the example below, `--skip-tables-list=comments` whenever
  246. * the alias @live is the target of an sql-sync command, but comments will
  247. * be included if @live is the source for the sql-sync command.
  248. * - '#peer': Settings that begin with a '#' are not used directly by Drush, and
  249. * in fact are removed before making a backend invoke call (for example).
  250. * These kinds of values are useful in conjunction with shell aliases. See
  251. * `drush topic docs-shell-aliases` for more information on this.
  252. * - '#env-vars': An associative array of keys and values that should be set on
  253. * the remote side before invoking drush.
  254. * - rsync command options have specific requirements in order to
  255. * be passed through by Drush. See the comments on the sample below:
  256. *
  257. * @code
  258. * 'command-specific' => array (
  259. * 'core-rsync' => array (
  260. *
  261. * // single-letter rsync options are placed in the 'mode' key
  262. * // instead of adding '--mode=rultvz' to drush rsync command.
  263. * 'mode' => 'rultvz',
  264. *
  265. * // multi-letter rsync options without values must be set to
  266. * // TRUE or NULL to work (i.e. setting $VALUE to 1, 0, or ''
  267. * // will not work).
  268. * 'delete' => TRUE,
  269. *
  270. * // if you need multiple excludes, use an rsync exclude file
  271. * 'exclude-from' => "'/etc/rsync/exclude.rules'",
  272. *
  273. * // filter options with white space must be wrapped in "" to preserve
  274. * // the inner ''.
  275. * 'filter' => "'exclude *.sql'",
  276. *
  277. * // if you need multple filter options, see rsync merge-file options
  278. * 'filter' => "'merge /etc/rsync/default.rules'",
  279. * ),
  280. * ),
  281. * @endcode
  282. *
  283. * Altering aliases:
  284. *
  285. * Alias records are written in php, so you may use php code to alter
  286. * alias records if you wish. For example:
  287. *
  288. * @code
  289. * $common_live = array(
  290. * 'remote-host' => 'myserver.isp.com',
  291. * 'remote-user' => 'www-admin',
  292. * );
  293. *
  294. * $aliases['live'] = array(
  295. * 'uri' => 'http://example.com',
  296. * 'root' => '/path.to/root',
  297. * ) + $common_live;
  298. * @endcode
  299. *
  300. * If you wish, you might want to put $common_live in a separate file,
  301. * and include it at the top of each alias file that uses it.
  302. *
  303. * You may also use a policy file to alter aliases in code as they are
  304. * loaded by Drush. See policy_drush_sitealias_alter in
  305. * `drush topic docs-policy` for details.
  306. *
  307. * Some examples appear below. Remove the leading hash signs to enable.
  308. */
  309. #$aliases['stage'] = array(
  310. # 'uri' => 'http://stage.example.com',
  311. # 'root' => '/path/to/remote/drupal/root',
  312. # 'remote-host' => 'mystagingserver.myisp.com',
  313. # 'remote-user' => 'publisher',
  314. # 'os' => 'Linux',
  315. # 'path-aliases' => array(
  316. # '%drush' => '/path/to/drush',
  317. # '%drush-script' => '/path/to/drush/drush',
  318. # '%files' => 'sites/mydrupalsite.com/files',
  319. # '%custom' => '/my/custom/path',
  320. # ),
  321. # 'variables' => array(
  322. # 'site_name' => 'My Drupal site',
  323. # ),
  324. # 'command-specific' => array (
  325. # 'sql-sync' => array (
  326. # 'no-dump' => TRUE,
  327. # ),
  328. # ),
  329. # # This shell alias will run `mycommand` when executed via
  330. # # `drush @stage site-specific-alias`
  331. # 'shell-aliases' => array (
  332. # 'site-specific-alias' => '!mycommand',
  333. # ),
  334. # );
  335. #$aliases['dev'] = array(
  336. # 'uri' => 'http://dev.example.com',
  337. # 'root' => '/path/to/drupal/root',
  338. # 'variables' => array(
  339. # 'mail_system' => array('default-system' => 'DevelMailLog'),
  340. # ),
  341. # );
  342. #$aliases['server'] = array(
  343. # 'remote-host' => 'mystagingserver.myisp.com',
  344. # 'remote-user' => 'publisher',
  345. # 'os' => 'Linux',
  346. # );
  347. #$aliases['live'] = array(
  348. # 'uri' => 'http://example.com',
  349. # 'root' => $aliases['dev']['root'],
  350. # ) + $aliases['server'];